Alternative Rock

White Noise Radio – Interview

Friday 30th June 2017

Tomorrow we see the release of the debut EP from Bristol alt-rockers White Noise Radio, and if you’re interested to find out exactly what to expect from ‘Cosmos‘, then you’re in for a meaty 4-track ride.  Riffs, hooks and loud choruses your sort of thing?  Then make sure you give these guys a spin.  They’ve also just released a fantastic video for lead single ‘Dawning‘ so make sure you scroll on down and give that a watch too.  White Noise Radio are very excited about the release and can’t wait to share their masterpiece, so not wanting to miss out on such worthy upcoming music I spend a moment finding out more ahead of the release.

For those who are just discovering you please could you tell me more about yourselves? Have you been in bands previously and what has driven you to form White Noise Radio?

We’ve all come from different backgrounds, but what brings us together is a love of clever, heavy music, and that’s what we want White Noise Radio to be – something that combines the artists we love with our own unique twist.

Your debut EP ‘Cosmos’ is due for release on the 1st July. How are you feeling about getting it out there, and what was the decision behind self-releasing?

Really good, the material on this latest record is top notch. We’re really proud of how it’s all come together, because it’s a real evolution from last year’s debut EP. As far as self-releasing, we never really considered going any other route – it worked well for us the first time around. Plus, no record companies wanted to buy the record off us!

What inspirations did you draw upon when putting your EP together; and what was the idea behind using a space theme?

We didn’t go into this record with any conception of what it would be, the theme of space really emerged once everything had been recorded. I suppose I’d say the theme isn’t really literally about space, it’s more about identity and how people’s personality influences the way they interact with the world around.

Who did you work with to create the video for your first single ‘Dawning’ and how did it feel to see it complete?

We worked with the amazing Rob Ellis, a local cinematographer who brought a huge amount to the project. Not only did he shoot some stunning footage, but he had a lot of artistic input into the video’s theme and how it was eventually realised. Anna Macarthur, our lonely astronaut, was a joy to work with, and likewise brought some great ideas to the table, making the video much more than it would have been without her!

What about the EP artwork, who was the creative genius behind that?

That was our very own Mark Detre, White Noise Radio’s bass player. We spent a whole evening together as a band brainstorming concepts for the artwork, fuelled by Mark’s Hungarian mother’s lethal homebrewed spirits, and what he put together is really amazing.

How easy was it to pick the final 4 tracks that made the EP, and were there any that didn’t make the cut?

3 of the 4 songs on this record were written in the 12 months following the last EP’s release, and because we put everything under such a microscope it took us a lot of work to create songs we were completely happy with. We even scrapped a near-finished demo of “Siren” and rewrote the entire thing in a different time signature. “Gone Inside” is actually an extensive rewrite of an old song of ours called “All the Right Reasons”, which our producer George Lever pushed us to do. We’re glad he did, because it’s become such a killer track!

Did you face any challenges when putting the EP together, and how did you overcome them?

Well, because we haven’t got a label behind us, we have to keep the costs of recording down, which means minimising the amount of time we spend in a studio. Because of that, we recorded all our guitar, bass and backing vocal tracks at home, which put a real strain on us – coming home from work and tracking guitars every night for several weeks is harder than it sounds!

What about your writing process as a band; how do you all come together to create the final track, and how do you know when a track is finished? 

Most of the writing in WNR happens with Ben and Antoine, who bounce off demos to send to the other two guys. Once we feel it’s in a playable state we’ll take it into the rehearsal room and see what works and what doesn’t – after a few weeks of this, the song will usually take on a final shape, but some tracks take longer than others. “Dawning” went through so many changes that the only section remaining from the original demo is the middle section!

Being in the early stages of your music career, how are you finding the whole process and have you been given any lasting advice?  

It’s an uphill battle, and while we’re slowly gaining ground there’s still a mountain to climb. A lot of the effort of being in a band isn’t a lot of fun, all the admin and organising, travelling and practising . . . it’s important to focus on the enjoyable parts, and not let it become a slog. George gave us some good advice, in that we have to treat the band as a business – you can’t just say yes to everything, because you end up doing loads of stuff that doesn’t help you.

Have there been any personal highlights so far, and what can we expect next from the band? 

The biggest highlight so far has been our drum-tracking day at Middle Farm studios, where Black Peaks recently tracked their debut album. It’s such a beautiful location, and there was so much cool stuff there – George got a cracking sound, too!

White Noise Radio will be out on the road this summer, so keep an eye on their website for details of upcoming shows.

Connect with White Noise Radio via their Website, Facebook and Twitter.

The Firelight Opera – Interview

Thursday 25th May 2017

May is turning out to be a great month for new releases so far this year, and my latest discovery are Northern alt-rockers The Firelight Opera and their latest single ‘Alive’, which is taken from their forthcoming album ‘Communication Breakdown’.  What initially piqued my interest was that the band contains not one, but four vocalists.  Sounds like a bunch of very talented guys don’t you think?  Me too, and I’m already excited for the album release to hear more.  I caught a moment with the band to find out about The Firelight Opera and how they’re feeling about the release of their album.  Oh, and make sure you give ‘Alive’ a listen (link below), I promise you won’t be disappointed…

Hello! Please could you tell me a bit more about yourselves and how The Firelight Opera formed?

We are Chris Pettitt, Dan Foster, Lee Hardy, Ben Craigs and Kyle Martin. We’re an alternative/rock band from Sunderland which formed in the summer of 2012. We hit it off with songwriting and vocal harmonies instantly!

How did you come up with the name for the band and were there any other contenders?

The Firelight Opera came from a night of jamming and singing round a campfire. Also, like an opera we tell stories through our music. The lyrics are always deep and meaningful.

When did you all start playing music and have you been in bands previously?

We’ve all been playing music since school. We all performed in bands before The Firelight Opera was born. Chris, Lee and Kyle were gigging together since school but under a different name. Dan performed in another band and also did solo stuff and Ben also performed in bands.

What is your writing process as a band? How do you come together to create the final track and where do you take your inspiration from?

Generally, Lee and Dan write most of the lyrics and melodies then the whole band gets together and everyone puts their input in to bring the song to life. It works well.

Your album ‘Communication Breakdown’ is released on the 29th May. How are you feeling about the release and what can we expect from it?

We’re really excited for people to hear it! It’s got a bit of everything on it from huge rock anthems to stripped back acoustic tracks. All of the tracks have infectious melodies and catchy guitar riffs and there are plenty of vocal harmonies on there!

Are there tracks in particular that you’re most excited about getting out there?

At the moment we can’t pick a favourite. We were really excited to get ‘Alive’ out but we’re going to struggle to choose the second single. It’s a good problem to be faced with though so we’re not complaining!

With there being four vocalists in the band, how do you decide on who sings each part of a song and do you all get to take the lead on different tracks?

Having four vocals to play with makes songwriting really interesting! Chris and Dan have the biggest voices so they take most of the main vocals but Lee and Ben chip in here and there.

Who did you work with on the video for your single ‘Alive’ and who came up with the idea behind the story?

We worked with a local company in South Shields called Unified Media. Lee wrote the story/concept for the video and worked closely with the guys at Unified Media to bring it to its fullest potential. They were dedicated and worked relentlessly to make it work. We’d like to thank them along with Harry and Martin for their incredible performances.

What’s next for the band and will you be taking the album on tour?

This is something we’re currently looking into and hope to do soon. We’re excited to take our music further afield.

Finally, if you were invited to perform on the BBC Live Lounge, which song would you cover and why?

It would have to be House of the Rising Sun by The Animals. Chris has a huge voice and sings it better than the original (in our opinion, of course!).

Connect with The Firelight Opera via their Website, Twitter and Facebook.

Rat Face Lewey – Interview

Thursday 9th March 2017

Every so often a gem lands in my mailbox and this week it comes in the form of alternative grunge rockers Rat Face Lewey. They are an unsigned band originally from Derby but are currently working on new material and performing as many live shows as possible around London and the UK.  It’s always great to hear from bands directly and after checking out their material I could certainly hear a band with great potential, and with something very inspiring about their drive to push their music further.

Have you ever been drunk and decided to start a band?  I think we’ve all had that ambition, intoxicated or not, so I caught up with Jonny to find out more about the band and how their dream is becoming reality.

Tell me about how the band started and at what point it really clicked that you wanted to pursue music as a career.  You mention that a drunken night in Manchester fueled the idea, but making the decision to move to London sounds as though it wasn’t just an alcohol ambition.

Ha! There was certainly some other things going on at that time. Looking back it was a hazy period. I was living in Manchester and just wanted to be playing music with people I could connect with. I played with a few different bands in Manchester most notably, the Electric Kools, but I wanted to be playing gigs on a Wednesday night and be a part of a music community. London on the whole gives you this and to me it’s the greatest city in the world after Amsterdam and San Francisco. I love Manchester, but I didn’t want regrets I don’t want to talk my life away or let opportunities slip. Me and my brother were in a pub in Manchester and we decided to go for it. We had always played music separately and around that time I had started to fill in on guitar for some of his bands shows in London. I moved from Manchester, our original virtuoso drummer Ash moved from Nottingham and we moved in with my brother in South London. The first year was amazing, playing gigs, recording, hanging out together, rap battling and loving the moments. We are really focused on writing at the moment and we are in the practice room fine tuning our songs ready to road test over the Summer.

When did you all start playing music and have you been in bands previously?

I started playing guitar at 14 and taught myself how to play songs off Nevermind and some Oasis stuff. I used to have piano lessons when I was 6 or 7, which at the time I didn’t appreciate, but that early exposure to melodies and music has definitely had an effect on me. My brother, Mav our chaotic bass player, was a big influence on the bands I listened too. I would hear Nada Surf, Nirvana, John Frusciante and the Manic Street Preachers through him and probably annoyed him by becoming a huge fan of these bands and telling him how great this or that album was, which he probably already knew and politely listened to me bang on about. He started playing bass when he was younger and has played in Origin and Mad Mush and played gigs around Europe. He can play any instrument and is the backbone of our band and his stage presence is off the charts. He loves bands like Aerosmith, Oasis, the Chili Peppers and he also produces his own solo music.

How would you describe ‘Rat Face Lewey’ and your music to anyone hearing you for the first time?

It’s pure adrenaline. Honest, simple and catchy. I try and focus on the melody as much as possible and have started to play less frantic solos on the guitar and focus on creating big atmospheres and grooves. If you saw us live you would probably go away thinking it was either a complete train wreck or a masterpiece, it depends on the gig, but we put our heart and soul into every show to ensure people feel something from it and people get their moneys worth.

What music did you grow up listening to and who are your inspirations? You say you’re inspired by “real music”, but what would you say that is?

On the whole I feel music more than I listen to it. If a song or a piece music moves me makes my hair stand up or wakes something up inside of me then I’m drawn to it. That can be anything from Classical to Rock to Punk to computer game or film sound tracks. It’s real when it connects with me. My Mount Rushmore of music would probably be Kurt Cobain, John Frusciante, Matthew Caws and Mark Oliver Everett. You probably won’t find another person on the planet that would name those four and I would love to see it! There’s many more that are more obvious, like Brian Wilson, the Beatles and QOTSA. Recently, I’ve been listening to Warpaint, Baroness, Rush and Gojira.

You’re planning to release new material in September.  What can we expect to hear and how will it compare to your previous releases?

The heavy songs will be intense and in the same vein as ‘Digital Prison’ our last single release and the lighter songs have been heavily influenced by songs off ‘High/Low’, the first Nada Surf album. I have some big vocal ideas in my head and have been training my voice to sing in different styles. The songs I write are all very different and the fact that we are a 3 piece band gives us so much freedom and space to experiment. I would love to have a style and be able to write a whole record with a certain concept or approach. I love Mark Oliver Everett of the Eels who is a genius in this regard. As soon as an Eels song starts you know who it is. However, he can take you in so many different directions. He can write 100 great melodies and lyrics and then write 100 more.

What’s your writing process as a band, and how do you all come together with your ideas to get the finished track?  Do you write collectively or does someone come up with the underlying pieces first?

I usually come to practice with a song idea or a few riffs, melodies and a chorus. We then come together as a band and arrange the song. I usually write little jigsaw pieces of music and then need someone else to help me put the puzzle together. Sometimes it works out great and sometimes your left chasing a song for years. The best thing is when it comes together as a band and everyone contributes and brings their own style to the table. You record the rough demo in the practice room and everyone is buzzing. I read Josh Homme say once that there’s already one of you in the band and I completely agree with this.

Have you received any airplay on mainstream radio and how are you finding the response to your material so far?

We receive the most plaudits from our fellow bands and musicians at our gigs. We have been played on XFM and receive heavy streaming activity from Spotify, Soundcloud and Apple and the song ‘Eagle Eyes Killing Strangers’, is heavily streamed from Israel. I love the modern world. Streaming and connecting with people. 10-15 years ago you would still be duplicating CD’s and praying someone walks into the local music shop and buys them. Although Napster killed the ‘business’ it also paved the way for everyone to have a go and you can find great music you like very quickly.

Who do you work with to create your music videos, and who comes up with the ideas for them? Is this something you do yourselves or do you have a team you work with?

Our recent videos for ‘Dead in the Ground’ and ‘Digital Prison’ were directed and edited by my super talented friend and acclaimed Director Jonathan K Harris. He has a great eye and we share a very similar taste in music, he also owns a Fender Stratocaster so I completely trust his vision. We recorded these two videos at the Buckle Factory on Seven Sisters Road in one day and we were very proud of the results. We have been discussing videos for our future releases and have come up with a concept we think people will love.

What live dates have you got scheduled for the year and where can we catch you performing?

You can check our webpage for tour dates. We are aiming to start playing in late April to road test the new songs. We are different to every other band live and once you see it you will know what I mean.

Do you have an ultimate aim for the band, and where do you hope your music will take you?

We played a gig in Hackney once, and at the end of our set a young woman climbed on stage and shouted down the mic ‘THIS IS WHAT MUSIC IS SUPPOSED TO BE!!!’ I want to record and play music that sticks in peoples heads and write songs that make people feel the same way I do about music. We want to be booked on festivals and have our music exposed to the biggest audiences possible.

Where there’s chaos there’s opportunity.

Connect with Rat Face Lewey via their Website, Facebook, Twitter.