EP

Familiar Things – Interview

Saturday 14th July 2018

Formed in 2017, Familiar Things is a five-piece pop punk/alternative band from Philadelphia. The band delivers a sound that reflects their surroundings; one shaped in many ways by the Philadelphia punk revolution of recent times. Thoughtful, honest and emotive; a raw accessibility balanced out by a melodic finish and more non-traditional pop-punk instrumentation and arrangements, including piano, acoustic guitar, and three-part vocal harmonies. Subsequently, the band sees themselves drawing on more mainstream alternative influences and credit the early-mid 00’s purveyors of the genre with much credit. The likes of The Starting Line, Yellowcard, and Mayday Parade all shining through on debut release “Fade Into The Scenery”.

What’s your background, and have you all been in bands previously?

Each of us has had our own experiences with other bands. Myself, Bebo, and our guitarist, Jon, were in a band four years ago called Straight Down Maple. The music itself had potential, but we never got the chance to do anything with it. Our producer and lead guitarist, Ty Magazzu, was in a band called Ghosts And Androids that also found some success. Probably the most previously successful member of the band is Kevin, who was part of the Philly based Anomaly. Also, I am a music teacher and learned most of what I know about song writing from my piano and music theory courses in college.

Your EP “Fade Into The Scenery” has been out for a few months now. How are you finding the response to your music so far?

We feel incredibly grateful at the level of response we’ve gotten on the EP. We have heard back from people from all different parts of the world with kind words about our debut EP, and as a band of our modest caliber, it has been extremely humbling and appreciated.

How did you work together to create the final EP? You’ve been a band for around a year and have a great release under your belts. I’m guessing there’s a strong bond and work ethic between you all to be achieving that already?

The thing that I’ve grown most fond of is our commitment to perfection, and of course, the laughs. When we are in our rehearsal space we are either stringently perfecting our sound, or laughing our asses off. It makes rehearsal time both effective and enjoyable. I’m finding this same thing to be true as we sit in the studio recording our newest single, Lately, these guys plain and simple know how to have fun.

What’s the story behind the EP, and what influenced the tracks?

Fade Into the Scenery is a work of collaboration and discovery. We were new together, and thus had to find our place as songwriters working together. Four of us brought the individual structures of all five songs and we worked together to make these songs embody all of our influences and styles. In regard to lyrics of each track, they are either experiences we have had or stories that we wrote for people to relate to and connect with on us a personal level. Music is, after all, about discovery.

Are you looking to shoot any music videos for the release?

We have been workshopping music video ideas for our upcoming single, Lately, but the more we consider the resources and time it would take we’re feeling less and less hopeful. With proper planning and a little luck we hope to put something tasteful out come mid-fall, but the song selection is still TBD.

What’s the local music scene like in Philadelphia for up and coming artists, how easy is it to get gigs, and is there a large pop-punk following?

We feel we are extremely fortunate to live in a city that is so open to local DIY music in Philadelphia. The availability for shows is remarkable, and the turnout in the pop punk community is inspiring. We really couldn’t thank the Philly pop-punk scene more for its continued and growing support.

Do you remember the first gig you performed at live, and how do you feel your live shows have evolved since then?

The first show that we played was a Tuesday night at William Street Common. It was 10:30 and two of us were sick. It was without a doubt the worst it could be. The silver lining around that show, though, was that they have only gotten better. We’ve had the pleasure of playing at staple local venues like The Barbary, The Voltage Lounge, and Kung Fu Necktie. As a performing band I’d say we’d pride ourself on our tightness and sheer personality.

Are there any bands in particular that you aspire to open up a stage for?

Between the five of us, it seems like the band that we look up to the most is Mayday Parade. We all really admire their songwriting style and energy, and it would be a dream come true to be able to share a stage with them.

Being in the early stages of your music career, how are you finding the process so far and have you been given any lasting advice?

This is all just so cool. Of course the shows, and making friends, and free drink tickets are all amazing, but I’m finding excitement in other aspects of our music as well. For example, we have been putting a lot of thought into branding, and how our look relates to our sound. There is an immeasurable amount of things that contribute to a bands success, and concisely following those avenues is pretty exhilarating.

What are your plans for the rest of the year?

Over the next few months, we have a few more local shows lined up between Philly and New Jersey. After that, we are looking to go on our weekend tour sometime this fall to some of the surrounding states in the Northeast, with some other local shows thrown in. We are also in the process of recording a new single that we are shooting to debut sometime around late July or early August, with a new EP hopefully on the way later this fall or winter.

Connect with Familiar Things via their Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

The Burden – Interview

Wednesday 6th June 2018

Canadian post-hardcore quartet The Burden released their new EP ‘Presence of Past Tense’ back in February, and it has been described as their first step in meshing as a new band since their recent line-up changes.  With the tracks sitting somewhere between their previous EP and upcoming full-length record, they decided to give them their own crown of glory, and release them as a taster of their progression in sound and solidity as a band.  The Burden bring 5 solid tracks that channel from heavy metal to progressive metal, with elements of pop and influences from late 00’s post hardcore, and with Underoath vibes I was eager to catch a moment and find out more about the release and future plans.

Your EP ‘The Presence of Past Tense’ has been released for a while now. How have you found the response to the record so far?

The response has been overwhelmingly positive. People have been really into it, and its been getting a lot more exposure than our debut album did, so its been really awesome to see our fanbase growing as a direct result of this release. And these songs have been really well received live. We played a show fairly close to the release date and people knew the lyrics and were already singing along.

What’s the story behind the EP?

The EP is a collection of songs we were working on around the release of our first record Modern Disease and some songs written while working on our next album. We had a bit of a lineup change between Modern Disease and now, so there was a bit of an adjustment period in writing and settling into the new dynamic of having different band members. The EP is what came out of that transition period, which is part of where the EP’s title actually comes from.

How did you find the process of putting it together, and did you face any hurdles you had to overcome?

The process of putting this record together was a headache to say the least.  There was roadblock after roadblock when planning to track the EP.  Eventually, despite our lack of skill we learned how to track ourselves and sent the tracks over to our producer, Jordan Chase for mixing. The second verse on A Search For Solace was actually rewritten last minute as well! A lot of the vocals were reworked/rewritten while tracking, but we are incredibly proud of how it all turned out.

What about the final track listing, were there any tracks that didn’t make the cut?

Actually – kind of the opposite! The songs that are on this EP were originally intended to be on a full length follow up record to Modern Disease. We really loved these songs but felt thematically they don’t fit perfectly with our newer material, so we released them on this EP to give them the love they deserve.

How would you say this release compares to your previous material, and how do you feel you’ve developed as a band over the years?

This band has been a roller coaster over the years, we feel as though this EP is a natural progression and what sonically makes sense for our band.  We retain the heavy/melodic contrast from our previous releases as well as left room for growth.  We are all big general music fans and we never want to define ourselves as a certain band, as we don’t want to stunt and limit where we can go in the future. We feel as though this new EP is right at home in our discography and it has come out far better than even we had anticipated it would.

The initial idea was for this EP to just be something to tide people over until the next album, but after Jordan finished with it we realized that it was just the first step in meshing as a band with our line up being solid for the first time in our history.

Who are your biggest influences and how do you draw upon your inspirations when writing and performing?

The main influence in the band is Underoath, for sure. We definitely take cues from their work ethic, do or die attitude and live performance. We like our live show to be put together, yet raw. So we really get inspired by that band. People often say we sound like ‘x band’ or ‘y band’, and everyone hears different things, but we’ve never been called a ‘knockoff’ of any particular band. So we think we’re doing a pretty good job of taking our influences and making them our own.

You’ve just released your official merch, and the t-shirt designs are pretty sweet. Who’s the creative genius that designed these?

Thanks so much! Our bass player, Ross, is actually the one who’s done all our design work. Merch, album artwork, etc. We get to keep pretty much all our visual creative direction internal because of his work, its really cool. It gives us freedom behind the scenes to explore a lot of different visual ideas for the band.

It must be a pretty cool feeling when you see someone in the crowd, or out and about wearing your shirt?

It’s so cool! There’s always been this lowkey stigma in the scene we’re a part of that says wearing the merch of the band you’re going to see is somehow uncool, but we absolutely love seeing the support in the crowd. It’s a really rewarding feeling, a reminder that there is someone there supporting the art you’ve created.

What’s the local music scene like in Prince George?

It’s strange to be honest, very touch and go.  We love the support we get from our hometown, we have a core group of people that we can always expect to turn out. However we come from a fairly small city, so for venues it’s pretty scarce.  There’s a thriving music and arts culture here with many talented musicians, but there’s not a lot of bands in our genre specifically. So booking shows can be difficult here for us because there isn’t always a large draw for our kind of music. We end up playing shows where we don’t really fit in because we are either too heavy, or not heavy enough.

Do you remember your first gig you performed live, and how do you feel your live shows have evolved since then?

Our first show was a blast! The venue was actually shut down the next day; not related to our show, we swear! I think we are definitely a much “tighter” band live now. There has been quite a few line up changes since the first show. We’ve definitely really clicked with our current line up though. We always make sure to push our energy level with every show. We love getting crazy and high energy on stage.

Where have been your favourite venues to perform?

The Habitat in Kelowna, BC is insane, we’ve only played there once but it was sold out & over capacity. Its a really nice place, great layout, stage space, etc. The crowd was really into it too. We’d love to play there again soon.

What are your plans for 2018, and what do you hope to have achieved by the end of the year?

We’re back into writing mode at this point, so we’re working hard on our second album. We’re aiming to have pre production done by the fall so we can hit the studio before the end of the year. We also just finished tracking a cover of a song by one of our influences as part of a tribute compilation we were asked to be a part of, so that will be out sometime this summer. We’re also working on booking some shows outside of our hometown for the fall as well. Our schedules have been a bit all over the place this last year, so we haven’t had as much opportunity to play Western Canada as we’d hoped. But this fall we should be hitting some of the major cities out here.

Connect with The Burden via their Website, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Awake At Last – Interview

Monday 30th April 2018

Awake At Last are a band that I’m always stoked about interviewing.  Each time we catch-up there seems to be a constant leap forward, as they continue to tour hard and perform even harder.  Life on the road is a big part of what these guys are all about, connecting with fans, and bringing their music to as many venues and stages as possible. They released their EP “Life/Death/Rebirth” a few months go now, which you seriously need to get on your radar if you haven’t given it a listen yet. It landed at #48 on the Active Rock Charts, stacked up over 100k streams on Spotify, has been requested by fans and spun on a number of radio stations, including SMX Octane!

Hello! It’s been over 2 years since we last spoke and it seems as though so much has happened since then. How are you all and what’s new for the band? 

We have all been doing great!  We’ve been able to keep a slow and steady climb as we continue to tour all over the country and interact with what is proving to be one of the most amazing fan bases ever.  We have a lot of ideas as far as branding is concerned and hope to put out some new music soon.

Your latest EP “Life/Death/Rebirth” has been out for a number of months now. How have you found the response to your music so far? 

It seems like our fans have been loving it.  It’s also been pretty well received by newer audiences and people who may not necessarily be into our genre.  I think that people dig the individualistic nature of the sound because they can’t really peg it as a certain genre, which makes it super exciting to know that we’re developing a sound all our own.  I’ve been blown away at how much support we’ve seen since the release.

You did a lot of funding for the EP through Indigogo. How was that experience and is it a platform you would consider using again to fund for future releases? 

I really like the idea of Indiegogo because it gives those fans who really love what we do a chance to be a part of those early phases and reap some rewards as a result.  I think that with the current meta of the internet, if bands and fans interacted more through 1 on 1 interactions, you can build the kind of fanbase who will always support and help build your career.  It becomes this amazing connection and it really helps with all the pressures of being an unsigned independent band.

You seem like a band that are constantly on the road touring your music. Do you enjoy life on the road, and how has playing so many shows helped your live performances? 

I love being on the road a lot.  It’s definitely not for everyone, but once you get into that mindset of waking up every morning with goals, and a plan to execute it becomes very liberating.  The more we play on the road the tighter the band gets and the tighter our bond as a band gets.  It’s my favorite aspect of what we do.  Even though the corporations have managed to almost turn our country into a giant shopping mall I find that the adventure is in the people you meet.  Interacting with all the people who love what we do, and even the new ones we just meet is extremely rewarding.

What about how you’ve evolved as a band? I’m constantly impressed by your drive, but what has been your main focus with “Life/Death/Rebirth?”  

We just want to continue to elevate and inspire people to pursue fulfilling lives, and do what they love and find a way to make a living doing so.  If we can be living examples that manifest destiny, and the law of attraction work then I hope that people will find the strength in themselves to also do what they love.  It’s too easy to get caught up in the societal machine of everything.  Depression and anxiety are at an all time high because people are taught to make the safe choices.  We want to light a spark in those who decide that making the adventure of your life about what you love doing the most is worth every trial and tribulation.

How are you feeling about performing at this years Vans Warped Tour? That’s got to be an experience for any band, and even more so knowing it’s going to be their final year. 

It’s an immense honor to be amongst the final bands to perform in the final warped tour.  It’s always been a huge staple in our scene and meant a lot to us individually as we grew up in the days when we thought it would never end.  I’m going to embrace and live that experience up to the fullest and continue to carry the torch for the bands of the genre, in hopes that even as warped tour fades, new festivals will rise to take its place and we can continue to evolve the music scene.  When one door closes, thousands open.

Spending time with your fans is something that you like to do after a show. How important is it for you to connect with your fans in this way? 

It’s one of the most important aspects of the band.  We wouldn’t exist if we didn’t have our amazing fans supporting us and helping us continue to live our dream.  We’ve been on shows with other bands where they will hang out at their vans all day before playing, but I think they’re missing out on one of the best parts of being a musician.  I’ve had amazing conversations with fans and it’s always made all of the hardships worth it.  It also creates a closeness with us and our fans and makes us feel like a unit.  It’s something we’ve always loved doing, and hopefully something we can continue forever.

I have to ask you about your single “Never Be A Memory” and the decision behind it being a stand-alone track? It’s a great song but hasn’t made it on to any of your EPs. 

Questions, and Never Be A Memory were both recorded and written during a transitional phase in the band.  In a lot of ways we were still trying to figure out what direction the band was going to go and after doing so it helped us figure it out.  It wasn’t necessarily meant to be a stand alone, it still resonates within the theme of doing what you love and pursuing your dreams, it was just built during a transition period, and when Life Death Rebirth ended up being a concept album there wasn’t really room for it on the EP.  But it’s still a fan favorite, and I’ve always dug the song.

Do you have much downtime outside of the band and are there any hobbies or other interests that you enjoy? 

The band keeps us pretty busy, but since we’re still independent and unsigned we all work jobs as well.  We all enjoy hanging out and we all have different vibes that we get into when we aren’t in the band. I know I dig role playing games, some of the others like the beach and such.  For the most part the band stays pretty focused on music because it’s the driving force behind who we are.

What are your plans for the year ahead, and what do you hope to achieve? 

I’d like to see the vision start to really come into itself.  We’ve been working on some new songs for a while and with any luck I’d like to see a release in our near future.  There’s a lot of branding and thought that has gone into this full length record.  I have a vision for what I hope it will accomplish and look forward to finding ways to bring the pieces together to make it happen.  With that I’d like to get a bit more visual and really help to tell the story of what we do, and why we do it hopefully inspiring others to pursue their passions and dreams as well.

Connect with Awake At Last via their WebsiteFacebook and Twitter

TrueHeights – Interview

Wednesday 21st March 2018

Acclaimed young alt-rockers TrueHeights are back with a bang, announcing their new EP “Days We Found”, and their signing to We Are Triumphant. Hailing from the Midlands, the band have quickly picked up a huge amount of momentum from their debut EP “TH15”, and secured themselves a well-established fan base from their time on the road, supporting the likes of Freeze The AtlanticDEAD!Lonely The Brave, and Fatherson. Armed with the addition of guitarist Alex, and a brand new EP which is due for release on the 6th April, TrueHeights are hoping to put some serious heart and meaning back in to the UK’s rock scene.  I catch a moment with lead vocalist Zakk Poland ahead of the release to find out what we can expect from their new material.

Please could you tell me a bit more about yourselves? Have you been in bands previously, and what has driven you to form TrueHeights?


We are a 6 piece rock band from the Midlands. We have all come from very different backgrounds which I think makes our song-writing process very interesting. Myself and my brother Luke have come from a post-hardcore/punk background then we have the Maugham brothers and Kris who have come from a dance/electronic metal background and then Alex who has been a solo singer songwriter for many years – so our ideas are very diverse in the rehearsal studio to say the least! We formed TH because we wanted to unify a few of our favourite things from the genres we all love and create a sound that was accessible to more than the very niche sub-genre’s we were all a part of before.

Your debut mini album release “TH15” received quite a lot of momentum. How have you found the response to your music so far?

Thank you! “TH15” was received better than we could have ever imagined. Its mesmerising being able to travel the country and have crowds singing your songs back to you – it’s very moving.

You’ll be releasing your new EP “Days We Found” on the 6th April. How are you feeling about getting new music out there, and are there any tracks in particular that you’re excited about being heard?

We are SO excited to release “Days We Found”. Some of these songs have been sat behind the curtains for nearly 2 years and now we can finally unveil them to you guys! The response to the singles so far have been mind-blowing and we are so lucky to have such a loyal fanbase that are happy to stick with us for 3 years without releasing any music. We are so excited for the two songs which aren’t due to be released as singles, because the first time anyone will hear them is when they buy the full record. Keep your ears open for “No Tomorrow” and “Maybe”.

How would you say this compares to your previous material, and how do you feel you’ve developed as a band over the past 3 years?

It pushes the boundaries a lot more than “TH15”, in the way that we have collectively tried to diversify our writing style – making 5 very different sounding songs, with the idea that different people will have different favourites. As a band we have played a hell of a lot of shows over the last 3 years and learned a hell of a lot about each other and about our writing style and what works best for us – especially with the addition of Alex. We have become more of a team and everyone brings their own ideas and interpretations on each others work – I feel the sound has matured a great deal.

What’s your writing process and how do you work together to create the final track? Being a 6-piece band, how do you make sure you all have a creative input?

So, normally one of us will bring an idea to the studio and then we will all build on it. Depending on which instrumental idea is presented as a melody core, that is USUALLY what defines the overall sound and feel of the track, i.e “Stay” was written around a synth hook, giving it a more dancy feel. Whereas “Exit Route” was written around a riff idea I had written in my bedroom on an acoustic guitar! When I write on an acoustic guitar I always imagine I’m playing to a huge festival crowd with a huge wall of amplifiers behind me… 9 times out of 10 I’m sat in my room and I can hear my mum hoovering the stairs…SO rock and roll. We usually write a song in a few phases to make sure everyone is 100% happy with their parts, before our producer rips them to shit and makes us re-write them anyway!

Who did you work with for the video to your latest single “Still Moving Colour”, and how does it feel when you get to see the finished videos for your singles?


We worked with a good friend of ours Jay Hillyer (Cabin Boy Jump Ship). His work is awesome! He’s pretty much done most of our videos. He lets us have a lot of creative input on them which is great. We write and direct all of our videos ourselves.

You released an acoustic version of “City Lies” to raise money for Bedfordshire & Northamptonshire Multiple Sclerosis Therapy Centre. Could you tell me why this charity is so close to your hearts, and how the donations helped the centre?

This charity is especially close to our drummer Kris, who’s uncle is an MS sufferer. The whole charity release was conducted by Kris himself. It was such an honour to have such amazing, iconic people on board with us such as Connor Ball (The Vamps), Nothing But Theives, Madina Lake, BBC Introducing etc.

You’re on the last few dates of your current tour, but thinking about all the live dates you’ve ever played, which has been the most memorable and why?

We always tell the story of how I broke Ash’s leg on stage, but that was honestly one of the best moments of my life. I think on a serious note, one of the most memorable ones was MOM Fest in Eindhoven, ND. We got to play our first show overseas to thousands of people and it was mind-blowing. Not only that, but that was Alex’s first ever TH show.

How do you find the music scene in the Midlands? Being a music blogger/gig-goer from the area too I’m interested to hear your thoughts on the local scene and venues.

Yeah we love our local scene. I’m in the firm belief that we wouldn’t be anywhere right now had it not been for that. There’s not an AWFUL lot in the Midlands but that’s what makes events so special. We have so much love for Zephyr Lounge (Leamington), The Phoenix (Coventry), The Kasbah, and pretty much all of the venues in Birmingham. It’s a close-knit scene and we love it!

What are your plans for 2018, and what do you hope to have achieved by the end of the year?

We would love to have another big tour in place and hopefully some more new music! Keep your eyes peeled…

Connect with TrueHeights via their Website, Facebook and Twitter.

The Anchor – Interview

Saturday 3rd March 2018

Formed in the Spring of 2014, Denver quintet The Anchor have earned their reputation with a series of explosive releases. The band stakes their reputation with an emotive, impactful and ambitious sound, balancing thunderous breakdowns with majestic melodies and a heartfelt delivery riveting metalcore sound and high-octane live shows.  In addition to the band’s debut LP, “The World Ahead” debuting at #7 on the iTunes Metal Chart, the female-fronted outfit have also made a name for themselves since the viral explosion of their YouTube series, Metal Kitchen, which sees Linzey Rae cook with some of the genre’s leading names.  This week has seen the release of their current EP “Make It Last” so I caught up with the band to discover how they formed, what they hope from their latest release, and what we can expect next.

Hello! Please could you tell me some more about the history of the band; where and how did you meet, have you been in bands previously, and what made you decide to form The Anchor?

We all met in an old band, called Of Ashes. Cory and Ryan started the band playing in Ryan’s apartment back in 2012 and I joined them on bass in early 2013. We played a few shows but it sort of tapered off. After really thinking about what we wanted out of music and a band, we started over and formed The Anchor. Later down the road we found Keenan and met Adam, who was a studio drummer at the time. We’re basically the oddest pack of weirdos out there and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Your new EP “Make It Last” is due for release on the 23rd February.  How are you feeling about getting new music out there?

We’re honestly really excited to hear about what people’s new favorite songs are. On our last album, fans would tell us about their favorite songs and why it was their favorite. They would share with us these amazing stories and we were able to connect with them on a very personal level. We can’t wait to hear new stories and connect with old and new fans alike!

Your previous release debuted at #7 on the iTunes Metal Chart, but how does your latest material compare, and are you hoping for bigger things?

An album is like a snapshot about how we felt at that point in time and trying to compare it to what we wrote a year ago is kind of irrelevant and unimportant. Of course we hope this upcoming album will do great, but whether or not it sells better or worse than the last album doesn’t matter. We are proud of what we created together and we love preforming it. That’s all that matters.

What can we expect from “Make It Last”, and how did you find the process of putting it together?

The upcoming EP, Make It Last, is a tribute to all the amazing people we have met throughout our lives and through our musical endeavor. Each song is a testament to how relationships, for better or for worse, play a role shaping who we are. Every relationship and story we have heard has had a huge impact on us and continue to inspire us to be the greatest versions of ourselves possible. We really tried to not allow ourselves to be restricted by norms of our genre. We wanted to try to write something that was out of our comfort zones and push ourselves as musicians.

Can you tell me about your writing process, how you work together to create the final track, and how you know when a song is ready?

Cory generally writes the basic structure of the song and then brings it to the band. From there, we all collaborate together and get the songs about 90% done. The major leg work usually happens in the studio. Our producer, Taylor Hahn, plays a huge part in taking our songs to the next level. I think what has made the writing process so successful is that everyone plays a specific roll. We all have common vision for the band and have a deep understanding of “The Anchor” sound if you will.

Who are your musical influences, and are there any bands in particular that you model yourselves on?

Gin Blossoms, U2, Prince, and most importantly Steely Dan… ;)

Which tracks from your new EP are you looking forward to performing live?

AVOW!!! That song is super high energy and gets a crowd moving. Every time we have played it, things always end up getting a little rowdy.

How are you finding the music scene in Denver, and are there any venues in particular that you enjoy performing at?  I recently interview another band from the area that said there’s a lot of supportive venues and promoters.

We have been so fortunate to be a part of the Denver scene. We have received endless support and love from everyone in it. There is a promoter in particular, Zack Beecroft (Swinging Noose Productions), who genuinely cares about the scene and the bands in it. He always sees to it that bands are paid and well taken care of. The scene here is amazing!

I’m sorry but I have to ask; does “The Ghost Inside Makes Shepherds Pie” ever get performed live?

We learned it a long time ago when the video first came out. We regularly practiced it just in case someone requested, but it turns out that the people who come to our shows really aren’t that interested in hearing it. So we all have kind of forgot how to play it. However, bribe us with enough girl scout cookies and we’ll play just about anything.

What’s the ultimate aim for the band and where do you hope your music will take you?

There isn’t really an end goal. We plan to keep on working hard, writing music and touring. We all have such a passion for what we do and we can’t wait to see where it takes us.

Connect with The Anchor via their Website, Facebook and Twitter.

Elesa Marmo – Interview

Sunday 25th February 2018

Elesa Marmo is a singer/songwriter from Long Island, New York.  She’s been writing music since she could remember. After many years of wanting to pursue music, as well as releasing music as part of the indie duo The Wilts, Elesa most recently released her debut EP, titled “Clear Blue,” which has been produced by Greg Almeida (of alt rock band VISTA). Growing up listening to a large variety of mainstream pop artists, her original music is heavily influenced with electronic sounds and soft acoustic feels and blends those sounds perfectly.  I catch a moment with Elesa to find out how it’s all going since the release of her first solo EP.

Hello! Please could you tell me about yourself, how it all started and at what point you decided to make a career out of music?

Hello! I’m Elesa. I’m a singer/songwriter from Long Island. I’m 23 years old. I’ve always wanted to be a musician, I remember watching all my favorite pop stars when I was little perform and all I wanted was to be on stage just like them. Once I taught myself guitar and could put music to my lyrics is when it really set in that this is what I want to do. 

You have recently been part of the successful indie duo The Wilts. What was the decision behind moving away from this and pursuing a solo career?

I think we both just really wanted to make our own stuff. We made one EP together but unfortunately didn’t get to play live shows together. He’s great though, he’s got music out as his solo project called Lated and he’s in a band called Shorebreak as well and he’s so talented so definitely check him out! We will I’m sure do some shows eventually but we just wanted to kind of explore our own styles and find ourselves musically.

Your first EP “Clear Blue” was released in January. How are you finding the response to your music so far?

Everything I’ve seen has been so lovely. The responses have been so positive so far so I’m over the moon!

How did you find the process of putting your EP together, and did you face any hurdles that you had to overcome?

Everything was just so exciting and new to me having full creative control and just really finding my sound. I don’t think there were really any hurdles, I guess maybe some writers block at some points but it really just all flowed out.

What about the final track listing, were there tracks any that didn’t make the cut?

I always knew I wanted a four track EP so I really focused on making four really solid songs, I was proud of but of course as a writer I have my book of songs from when I was a kid to now of lyrics.

How did the opportunity come about to work with Greg Almeida, and how was the experience for you?

We went to college together and he did The Wilts EP and we always said during that process that we wanted to work together. The experience working with him was incredible he really knows so much about the production side and he would help me so much with writing as well and just made the songs sound exactly how I wanted and would hear things I didn’t even think of to add to them.

Could you tell me about your writing process, and how you know when a song is ready? Being a solo artist do you have anyone to bounce ideas from?

It’s different every single time. Usually it’s lyrics first for me but it can be music first. Greg really was the person I went to with lyrics and ideas and we would take it from there.

Who are your biggest musical influences, and how have they encouraged and helped you to develop your sound?

Stevie Nicks has always been an idol of mine. I love Lorde as well and her style and Carly Rae Jepsen, me and Greg listened to her while making this and we love her so much. I love Miley Cyrus too I’ve always been a big fan of hers.

What’s the music scene like in Long Island, and are there any venues in particular that you enjoy performing at?

It’s small but it’s nice. I think being near such a big city it’s great too. I haven’t performed live yet since it’s the first EP but there’s some venues of course I wanna try out!

What are your plans for the year ahead, and what live dates do you currently have lined up?

I’m currently working on getting the production ready for some live shows so that’s my focus right now. I’ll hopefully make some new music and just see where this takes me!

Connect with Elisa Marmo via her Website, Facebook and Twitter.

Nath Bravo – Interview

Thursday 22nd February 2018

Hailing from Mexico, but currently residing and performing in London, Nath Bravo has already spent a lot of time in the music industry pursuing opportunities. Having won a competition back in 2015 with an original song called “Alma Ajena” (foreign soul), Nath went on to write demos and took her first trip to London.  After 2 months in the capital she had played at over 30 venues and released her first single “Mercy” Nath was later discovered through one of her videos on Facebook and was asked to join the Vidanta group in Mexico, for which she spent 6 months as part of the team.  Following on from this Nath went back home to start focusing on her songwriting and creative journey. Now, with a brand new EP and single “Shadowman”, which was released at the end of November, she’s currently gigging all around London promoting and performing her own original music.


You have quite a musical background, and although you’re only 21 it sounds as though you’ve already spent a lot of time in the industry.  How have you found the experiences so far, and how has it helped you to develop and get to where you are today?

Well, I think it’s been a whole journey. Each phase I’ve gone through has built something different and in retrospect, it’s all been pushing me somehow till the point I’ve turned into this person. When you spend so much time and passion on something you believe in, you get the purest relationship with it, and the more I get into music, the more I get into myself. I’ve still got many many things to experience and I’m sure that in one year, they’ll bring me to another different phase without even noticing; I guess that’s how it works.

Do you feel that you have reached the point of finding the authentic sound and style that you were looking for with your music?

Authenticity is something that happens when you are truly honest on what you do, so, I think I’ve kept on being like that with everything I write and perform. That being said, I’m at the moment really happy with my sound, so I’m enjoying the feeling cause, at the end, I think it’s all about finding something that feels right. To trust your instinct and to own it is always gonna take you to a good place. I like to surprise myself.

You were born in Mexico but have spent time in London recording and performing. What is the music scene like in Mexico, and what was the decision to bring your music over this side of the pond?

I think Mexico is rich in culture and there are many talented creative souls out there, I love it. It’s interesting, different from the one here, as any other music scene, obviously, but the Mexican music has a special place in my heart. A couple of years ago, when I was living in Vancouver, a dear friend of mine recommended me to come to London to try my music out, and so I did. I came in the summer of 2016 and loved it; I guess it’s a place where I got a lot of my influences from, so, it just felt right to do it. This city is a sort of capital for music and therefore has many platforms and great opportunities for upcoming artists, which is wonderful. You should always be free to go out there and find the places and things that work for you.

Are there any venues in particular that you enjoy performing at?

I think The Water Rats has been one of my favorites. It’s such a great place to perform; intimate and nice vibe.

It’s been a few months now since the release of your EP.  How are you finding the response to your music so far?

It’s been good, I think that every time you release your work it’s a bit scary cause you are giving a bit of yourself for the world to listen and you never know what the response is going to be like, but I’ve seen that people have liked what I’m doing, so it’s been good, I’m glad!

Your latest single “Shadowman” has the most beautiful video to accompany it.  Who did you work with for the video, and where was it shot?

Thank you! It was filmed and completely made by my talented brother Aaron Bravo, mainly while on a road-trip in Iceland. I told him the meaning behind the song and the vibe, and he just instantly got it and brought his magic to the project. There’s a “male intervention” which was shot in Mexico.

Could you tell me about the single and the meaning behind it?

Well, in “Shadowman” the lyrics are quite personal, and still relatable. It’s a tribute to fear and the way I feel when it happens. I was able to experience it myself by the time that I wrote the song, so it just came naturally. It’s like you are a kid, trapped in a cage that only you can destroy, it’s a chaotic state of mind, but still, pretty fascinating as well. 

What’s your writing process?  Being a solo artist do you have anyone to bounce ideas from, and how do you know when a song is ready?

I think it depends. A song can just happen and sometimes I make the song happen. Sometimes I have a very specific idea in my mind to be portrayed, and some others I just sit in front of the piano and let it be as it emerges, and as soon as I get something half decent, I keep on working on it until I feel it’s ready; I guess I just feel it. Once it’s almost done, I send it to some good people I trust to know what they think and to know if it’s not only cool in my mind.

You were invited to join the group Vidanta back in 2016, which you were part of for 6 months. What was the decision behind not continuing with the band, and what is it about being a solo artist that has made you pursue this instead?

Well, Vidanta is a big resort in Mexico and I was invited to the group as a solo artist, so I was headlining shows pretty much every day. It was a step I needed to take in order to get more experience and I’m grateful it happened. After 6 months I just felt it was right for me to continue with my own path and project so I left to focus on my songwriting and production, but I think I’ve been a solo artist my whole life, I just started making my own thing and it’s just worked out, however I do love to collaborate with other people, to share ideas and so on.

What’s your ultimate aim and where do you hope your music will take you?

To connect with people is always gonna be the ultimate aim, I think. I hope it leads me to a point where I can inspire the audience, that’d be amazing, and I always dream about being on the road, so maybe everywhere!

Connect with Nath Bravo via her Website, Facebook and Twitter.